New guidelines will usher innovation into Ayurveda


Sometimes, the biggest challenge against bringing progressive change to a certain field comes from within that field itself. This is largely the same for Ayurveda as well. The old guard of the sector, comfortable nestled in the way things are, not only don't desire change but may actively fight against it. Multiple attempts to organize the sector and bring it to the mainstream field because for this very reason. 


But now, the Central government has taken it upon itself to pull free Ayurveda, along with other traditional medicines, from the clutches of vested interests and have it redeployed for the welfare of the larger population. The sector, which has been stuck in a limbo for long when it came to enabling progressive changes, now expects to see innovations that will upgrade it to a level on par with modern medicine. 


Steps towards this can be found in guidelines issued by the Ayush Ministry for hospitals in the sector. One of them suggests Ayush hospitals integrate traditional practices with contemporary medicine to come up with new healthcare practices carrying the best of both systems to better address the needs of the population. This in itself brings huge scope for innovation in the field.  


One of the major criticisms against Ayurveda is how it cannot tackle an emergency. This is false. Some Ayurveda doctors may not be able to tackle an emergency, but that does not mean Ayurveda cannot. There are means and solutions for all kinds of emergencies in Ayurveda.


As per the new guidelines, all Ayush hospitals should be able to handle sudden healthcare needs during disasters and emergencies, epidemics, and pandemics. This makes it more or less mandatory to innovate and develop new treatment processes to meet the revised objectives. 


One major thing to note here is that the new guidelines aim to eradicate any sense of ‘untouchability’ that exists between modern medicine and traditional medicine. While the inherent bias of modern medicine against traditional ones is well known, it is also a fact that most practitioners of traditional medicine like Ayurveda view modern medicine with the same prejudice and contempt. 


This is one of the reasons that have prevented Ayurveda and other traditional medicines from changing and adapting to the times. With the new guidelines in effect, the central government intends to free the sector from the clutches of such outdated outlooks and bring progressive change and innovation into it. We can only wish that it happens sooner than just soon. 



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